Cogan’s syndrome

Cogan’s syndrome

Cogan’s syndrome is a nonsyphilitic interstitial keratitis (inflammation of the eye) and bilateral audiovestibular deficits (hearing problems & dizziness)

Cogan’s syndrome is defined as nonsyphilitic interstitial keratitis (an inflammation of the eye) and bilateral audiovestibular deficits (hearing problems and dizziness). It is more common in Caucasians than in other races. Onset of the disease is generally a brief episode of inflammatory eye disease, most commonly interstitial keratitis. This eye condition causes pain, lacrimation (tearing of the eye) and photophobia (eye pain with exposure to light). Shortly following these ocular (eye) symptoms, patients develop bilateral audiovestibular (ear) symptoms, including hearing loss, vertigo (dizziness) and tinnitus (ringing in the ears). Approximately half of patients ultimately develop complete hearing loss, but only a minority experience permanent visual loss. Other symptoms that may occur include headache, fever, arthralgia (joint pain), and systemic vasculitis (inflammation of the blood vessels). The symptoms typically deteriorate progressively within days. It is currently thought that Cogan’s syndrome is an autoimmune disease. The inflammation in the eye and ear are due to the patient’s own immune system producing antibodies that attack the inner ear and eye tissue

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Patricia Barber
Patricia Barber
For the last 20 years, Pat has been helping patients and caregivers live better lives, advocate for change, and Virginia's "right hand" making sure the "i's" are dotted and the "t's" are crossed. She lives in Michigan and couldn't picture herself doing anything but helping the autoimmune community.