Primary sclerosing cholangitis

Primary sclerosing cholangitis

Primary sclerosing cholangitis refers to swelling (inflammation), scarring, and destruction of the bile ducts inside and outside of the liver.

Primary sclerosing cholangitis refers to swelling (inflammation), scarring, and destruction of the bile ducts inside and outside of the liver. The cause of this condition is usually unknown. The disease may be seen in patients who have: autoimmune disorders, chronic pancreatitis, inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis), and sarcoidosis. Genetic factors may also be responsible. Sclerosing cholangitis occurs more often in men than women. This disorder is rare in children. The first symptoms are usually: fatigue, itching, and yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice). However, some people may have no symptoms. How well patients do varies. The disease tends to get worse over time.

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Patricia Barber
Patricia Barber
For the last 20 years, Pat has been helping patients and caregivers live better lives, advocate for change, and Virginia's "right hand" making sure the "i's" are dotted and the "t's" are crossed. She lives in Michigan and couldn't picture herself doing anything but helping the autoimmune community.