What causes autoimmunity?

What causes autoimmunity?

Search the AARDA Knowledge Base by Keyword

You are here:
< Back

The immune system normally can distinguish “self” from “non-self.” Some lymphocytes are capable of reacting against self, resulting in an autoimmune reaction. Ordinarily, these lymphocytes are suppressed. Autoimmunity occurs naturally in everyone to some degree; and in most people, it does not result in diseases. Autoimmune diseases occur when there is some interruption of the usual control process, allowing lymphocytes to avoid suppression, or when there is an alteration in some body tissue so that it is no longer recognized as “self” and is thus attacked. The exact mechanisms causing these changes are not completely understood; but bacteria, viruses, toxins, and some drugs may play a role in triggering an autoimmune process in someone who already has a genetic (inherited) predisposition to develop such a disorder. It is theorized that the inflammation initiated by these agents, toxic or infectious, somehow provokes in the body a “sensitization” (autoimmune reaction) in the involved tissues.

William Zrnchik
William Zrnchik
Will instinctively sees the fibers of opportunity woven throughout an organization, binds them into a cohesive whole, encourages others to extend their knowledge, and creates organizational advantage. He is a motivational leader who uses stories to inspire action, a champion of nonprofit leadership and development, and fosters innovation at all levels.